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minutes from now. until then a look at comments by u.s. army chief of staff general ray odierno. he said friday the greatest threat facing our nation is fiscal uncertainty and potential budget shortfalls. >> good morning, everyone. i'm mike owe hand lan and on behalf of peter singer and everyone else here at bookings, for the 21st century hearing on intelligence. we're welcome to have general ray odierno to speak in what could not be a more important week for american defense policy making. you're aware of budget challenges of the process and how these can affect our men and women in uniform and future military planning and current operations. no one could be a more distinguished and thoughtful person who discuss these matters than general odierno who i have great honor to know a dozen years now. he has been a friend of brookings and the a friend of the broader defense community and he has been a distinguished servant in our nation's military and our nation's defense throughout that period. he took the fourth infantry division to iraq and presided over its operations, directed its operat
to the u.s., it is very diverse. when that provision was passed there was concern was and diverse enough. since then it has become very diverse and these are adding 55,000 visas that are getting 8 million applications each year randomly allocated by computerized lottery. that is a somewhat odd way to set priorities. the commission said we should set priorities and we should deliver on them and the diversity visa program fell then and i think we would say now that it doesn't rise to that level of priority compared to the other priorities. >> the time of the gentleman has expired and recognize the gentleman from idaho for five minutes. >> thank you mr. chairman. i am excited that we are having this hearing. i think it's important to we modernize the immigration system. we agree we have a broken immigration system but we need to find a solution to the problems that we have by being fair. we need to be fair to the millions of americans that want to follow the rules law. we need to be fair to the millions of people that are waiting in line to come to the united states and i think we have to b
of the u.s. senate. on nights watched key public policy this. and every week in the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedules at our website, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> the programs that we had all under -- >> we are live now as u.s. chamber of commerce is hosting a quarterly briefing today on the outlook for the u.s. economy. martin regalia, chambers chief economist will talk about recent gross domestic product figure and what policy the obama administration and congress to propose to help stimulate the economy. this is just getting under way. >> a prime example of our ability to involve experts and debates on topics that are critical to the business community. i'm going to start us off today by queuing a video from christopher giancarlo of the gfi group, our sponsor, for this series. but for some want to make a brief announcement. this series, this economic series that we pose every quarter, has been accredited by the national association of state boards of accountancy to provide continuing prof
gathering. he may also touch on preventing cyber attacks on the u.s. like the one over the weekend blamed on china and threats from terrorists and rogue nations. he will be speaking at george washington university, and that starts at 6:30 p.m. with the u.s. in the unbreakable is week we're featuring some of booktv's we can programs on prime time here on c-span2. tonight former iraq and afghanistan general begins at 8 p.m. eastern with stanley mcchrystal and then fred kaplan, david petraeus, also jeffrey engel discusses a collection of essays on the goal for. >> the economy is at china basin is communism in name only these days. it's to preserve the power of the members of the communist party. but they basically threw most of the ideology aside when deng xiaoping opened the country up and is now a capitalist haven. the communism in china, they talk the talk at great length of these party congresses about marxism, leninism, to do. it's all about preserving the party power economic as a country continues to grow because they threw aside the most vestiges of common is alongside the in north k
: this is "the new york times" from february 20th. budget cuts seen as risk to growth in the u.s. economy. the cuts, most likely would reduce growth by 1 1/2 of a percentage point in 2013, according to a range of government and private forecasters. that could be enough though to again slow the arrival of a recovery, producing instead another year of sluggish growth and high unemployment. >> guest: well i guess if you take it from "the new york times" perspective you could make that argument because i think they see already a slowing in growth happening and this makes a convenient fall person for bad public policy been in place under four years of obama administration. we have slowed growth. it has been very stagnant. there are a lot of reasons for it. there are a lot of friction points put in place in our economy that need to be fixed. until we get our confess and the president of the united states to work together and begin to remove those friction points we'll continue have slow growth. if you look at a same slide you had up a moment ago ago, shows the sequester on the right hand of tha
prepare for defense against the threat to u.s. territory because of this coming capability, i think china is going to say, that's unacceptable. i'm hopeful. but at the end of the day as i say, the united states can't sit there waiting just for china. we have to be working with our allies on a comprehensive strategy, again, trying to let the region know that we want to be that important security guarantor. we also want to be a major trader, investor to the region and with asia-pacific. and for the stability and that trade and investment, and for prosperity and liberty to take root in this entry, any dynamic century with a rising asia pacific, it's going to have to take greater stability than north korea is right now letting it have. so for those initial comments, i will turn it back to our chairman. >> well, thank you, patrick the as always, very comprehensive argument. the floor is open. before we open the floor -- [inaudible] >> i want to pick up on patrick's point, and elaborate on what i see as the elephant in the room, which is china. outgoing defense secretary panetta told the house
. if somebody applied in the, to the mexico city u.s. embassy in january of 2007, and someone else crossed the border and is here in january of 2008, we all agree that the person who waited in line in 2007 should be able to get that green card before the person in 2008. we have to figure out how to do that so it's not an interminalably long period of time, that people are old or dead before they become. at the same time we have to make sure that this principle is kept because that helps us pass a bill. one other point i would make. we made two exceptions to that. dick durbin worked very hard on the dream act. we all agreed that should get special priority. >> young people born here as children? >> yeah. second we'll need something special for agriculture because it is a different situation. virtually whether you're in new york dairy country or arizona ranching country you can't get americans to do this kind of work. >> we're about to get the hook. my penultimate question, senator mccain, have you talked to speaker boehner about this? >> no but i did hear this statement a couple days ago wh
structures in europe and in the u.s. but there's another reason. the reason is, that has been said this morning, of course, economy is not always and only about data, but it's also about hegemony. it's a fight about ideas and the question is what kind of ideas? give you one little example. when we are talking about the europe crisis in europe, conservatives have reached one thing. the euro crisis on their view, and that is agreed on by many politicians and also by the public, the euro crisis is a crisis and has its reasons, in the public deficit. this is only one small part that they succeeded in bringing this view through, and it's also, that has consequences of course for economic policies. and, therefore, it's very important, and, of course, american economic debate has huge influence on european debates. it's very important that we are talking together, that we are working together and that we are trying to make a more differentiated approach on what and how to make policies engage the crisis. and that is, that is important because, and let me say that, because this room is ful
that. of their inventions by the way are doing just fine. in fact in 2012, u.s. global data traffic reached 207 bytes per month. a 62% increase over the previous year to the growth in the context processing to wonder seven bytes per month is the equivalent of watching 52 million dvds per month or sending 570 million text messages each second over our wireless networks and mobile usage will only continue to surge well into the future. its estimate of the mobile data tracking will grown ninefold in the next five years. furthermore, wireless devices are proliferating at an unprecedented rate. 51 million new devices are connected to the mobile networks in the last year alone bringing the total of american mobile enabled devices to 424 million roughly. it is estimated that 775 million wirelessly connected devices will be used by americans by the year 2017. to relieve the congested networks there to move wireless data to the unlicensed systems. last year 96% of the u.s. traffic associated with the devices was carried on the wi-fi network's at some point. not only does this percentage incl
undermine u.s. sustained growth. so, today, we are really releasing doctor for study and his analysis of these potential economic impacts of sequestration across the nation. let it be noted, no one can say that they were not forewarned about the full consequences of this very bad policy. and this morning, to emphasize the urgency of the situation, we will be delivering to literally every member of congress and the white house a letter signed by nearly 140 of our ceos. this is in addition to the letter that indeed he is doing, andy dick unite will be living as well. these are the ceos of aerospace defense companies and urging congress and the president to work now on a balanced bipartisan solution to sequestration. the letter states, as currently planned, sequestration will have a serious negative impact on the economy, national security, and federal agencies. in the current fiscal environment, we understand that defense spending must be part of any conversations about federal budget priorities. however, a lot of sequestration to occur is neither responsible nor is it strategic. the le
the u.s. patent office issued patent number 46,454. i will give you a pop quiz. it was simply labeled john deere plow. but the implement sketched out on the page could just as easily been labeled, as some historians have named it, one of the most important inventions in american history. they called it the plow that broke the plains, and it did. by replacing cast-iron with smooth steel, john deere's innovation opened up huge new swaths of land for cultivation. it made it possible for towns like aberdeen south dakota my hometown to exist. before it killing and maker took a grown man a full 24 hours. after it, it took as little as five. and every pile of soil overturned upended another assumption about what the land could produce. that, to my mind, has been the story, not just of agricultural success, but of national success. and, indeed, of global progress. this kind of game changing innovation has enabled us to leap ahead, to break the points, to increase harvest, and to frankly, feed the whole world. sometimes innovations come from the most advanced science, other times they
common border cities like in the u.s. and mexico that have a daily crossing with hundreds of thousands of people. then you have a big number of regular points of crossing which mexico doesn't have near the sources or the enforcement authorities or the border patrol equivalent to control. so, what the mexican government does is to stop the people as long as they begin to go to mexico and i would like to raise for your attention one issue that hasn't fully valued and consider the mexicans implementing the law and return by more than a hundred thousand people that were coming to this and they were stopped and detained for the mexican immigration to sotheby's and return we have arranged to meet that returned in a safe and orderly manner per 100,001 year. last year it was less of course, 120,000 but still, all of them trying to get into the u.s.. so yes money is needed and training is needed, institutional building is needed and the issue a new legal framework that is a way of looking at migration. now i think the new administration of mexico has the opportunity to implement the law >> let
commander of u.s. forces in iraq general loy austin to lead the command which is responsible for operations of middle east and afghanistan. general austin was joined by u.s. command nominee general david rodriguez who is a top commander in afghanistan from 2007 to 2011. this hearing is chaired by carl levin of michigan. it is two hours. >> good morning everybody and welcome this morning that committee considers the nomination of two very distinguished officers to the two of the most active and challenging combatant commands. general lloyd austin united states army nominated to the commander u.s. central command, and general david rodriquez, u.s. army to be nominated to be commander of the u.s. africa command. fees' to combat and commands, centcom and africom are the centers of gravity for the military's operations to counter the threat of terrorism. both nominees have served the country with distinction, and i want to faint each of you for your decades of military service and a willingness to serve once again. i and stand general austin's life and rodriguez's life are with us this morning.
about how the project is crucial to u.s. energy security. working with canada for our energy rather than getting it from the middle east. the letter talks about thousands of jobs at the -- that the project creates, not only building this $7 billion pipeline but that all the jobs that go to the refineries and the other activities that go with it and talks about safety, efficiency and reliability. now, the letter concludes mr. president, we consider the keystone x.l. pipeline fundamentally important to the future economic prosperity of both the united states and canada. we strongly urge you to issue a presidential permit and act swiftly to approve the keystone x.l. pipeline, signed by governors -- now, remember, senator baucus and i have been working on the effort on behalf of montana. you have got nebraska here. governor heineman just sent a letter in. now here are some of the other governors on this letter. sam brownback from kansas, the governors of north dakota and south dakota, governor mary fallon from oklahoma, governor rick perry from texas. in addition to other governors that aren
republicans will finally allow a vote on the nomination of robert bacharach to the u.s. court of appeals for the tenth circuit. because of this filibuster, something that stopped robert bacharach way last year, a man who came out of the senate judiciary committee unanimously, all democrats, all republicans voting for him, the people of oklahoma, colorado, kansas, new mexico, utah and wyoming have been needlessly denied his services as a tenth circuit judge for seven months. now, the judicial vacancies have again risen to almost 90. we have dozens of judges that get blocked for month after month after month, and then the republicans finally allow a vote on it, it passed with 90 votes or 95 votes or 100 votes, but every time that happens, the federal courts have diminished. every time that's happened, aside from the fact that the people of america wonder what in heaven's name we're doing in this body, anything as foolish as that, but the courts, the federal courts are supposed to be so impartial and outside of politics, they appear to be mixed up in politics. how does anybody, from any of
and national coordinator for security and counterterrorism. he also worked for several years in the u.s. department of state for the assistant secretary of state for political military affairs and managed the deputy assistant secretary of state for intelligence. in addition to the current roll at a good harbor, mr. clarke is an adjunct professor at the harvard kennedy school and author of several works related to homeland security and national defence, including his latest work "cyber war the next threat to national security, quote cohen and important for this panel what to do about it. we also have with us, daniel lohrmann, the chief security officer for the state of michigan. i do believe he's a native of maryland. mr. lohrmann began his career as a computer systems analyst with the national security agency and served in a variety of positions in the public and private sector for over 25 years. in 1997, mr. lohrmann served as chief information officer and director for the michigan department of management and budget. prior to his current role, mr. lohrmann worked for several years as
for the world innovation. they are a big part of why the u.s. remains the destination for the world's best and brightest. investment in education leads to innovation, which leads to more opportunity and jobs for all. our problem? the investment we make is not yielding maximum returns. each year our colleges and universities graduate approximately 40,000 foreign nationals with masters and ph.d degrees, many of whom are then forced to leave the kanji because there are not enough visa slots in the immigration system to permit them to stay. so rather than being able to invent things here in america, grow businesses or start one of their own, they do all these things somewhere else. now, fiona zhou is here with us today. she is earning her master's at gw school of engineering and applied science. originally from china, she's been india united states for five years, studying operations research and the systems engineering department. if you talk to her you will see, she's pretty smart. she would like to stay here. she wants to invest her talents in america, and maybe even start her own company.
as a u.s. senator from massachusetts. mr. president, i am proud to join my colleagues today in support of the violence against women act of 2013. i do so not just as a senator but as a mother of two daughters. this critical legislation has been held up for far too long, and it's past time for reauthorization. we have a serious responsibility to ensure that women and families are protected. the rates of violence and abuse in our country are astounding and totally unacceptable. according to a 2010c.d.c. study, domestic violence affects more than 12 million people each year. across the united states, 15 1/2 million children lives in homes in which domestic violence has occurred. and in my home state of north carolina alone, 73 women and children are killed on average every year because of domestic violence. let me say that number one more time. 73 women and children are killed every year due to domestic violence. these are alarming statistics, and we must act now to address them. since 1994, vawa programs, and in particular the stop program, that provides grants for services, training, of
and watch the data over what the u.s. should be engaged or involved in this the opportunities or lack thereof and the timing of the french operations and all those issues and about refueling tankers and who is paying for them within. looking more forward where do we go from here? what are some policy recommendations, prescriptions or at least guideposts for the pathway for word. etsy.com not going to -- i am no longer working in the policy, so obviously i can't make any policy decisions, but i frankly truly believe this is when to move into insurgency war and its of to the islamists to decide how they want to play this. one thing that happened in the french intervention that required some initial planning but i don't think that was factored in because the reaction was so quick is that what i have watched as the pouring of the refugees into neighboring countries. what i am hearing from a lot of the refugee camps especially on the side as a whole bunch have blended into the populations in those refugee camps. there is no vetting whatsoever. this is going to create some issues. the other
's number-one priority will be taking care of our troops. he is a veterans' advocate with the u.s.o. and he's won the respect and admiration of veterans' groups, in addition he's won the support of an extraordinary array of former secretaries of defense, ambassadors and diplomats, senior retired military leaders and in particular, two former members of this body who appeared with him at his testimony, former senators warren and nunn. i believe that chuck hagel is the right man for the challenges, the fiscal challenges that will confront the department of defense. put aside sequester, which i dearly hope will not happen, secretary panetta said it would be irresponsible for the congress to allow it to happen. many of us agree, it must be avoided. but apart from that challenge in the next month, or series of months, the long-term outlook for the department of defense is that it must do more with less, and secretary hagel, if he is confirmed, will have that management task, and he is one of the people in this country who is almost uniquely qualified to carry it out. and i believe that he will w
into a good movie. >> do you have any plans on expanding beyond the u.s. for instance if to europe [inaudible] thank you. >> international coverage is really interesting. i think that we are trying every single print issue of the magazine in at least a couple times a week to always have international content in the next. so we have had reported pieces from venezuela or we had someone embedded in afghanistan and we ran up peace in the last two issues on that so it's really important. the question just from the business standpoint is the economics that more often than not it works best for us to work with freelance reporters contributing for us in "the new york times" as well so we can get the content in the magazines but we don't have the bureau in paris or coal or something like that -- kabul or something like that that is the key to having a broad magazine in the future. >> are you going to make it weekly again? >> i don't think so. we don't have any plans to. it was hysterically, the previous ownership brought it down to buy a weekly. when i first bought the magazine i was a little skeptica
't want. >> i'm a student of the kennedy school. do you have any plans on expanding beyond u.s., for instance, to europe? [inaudible] hasn't been very successful expanding to many european countries. thank you. >> yeah. we're looking -- international coverage is really interesting. i think that we're trying every single print issue of the magazine at least a couple times a week to always have international content be in the mix. so we've had reported pieces from venezuela, or we had someone who was embedded in the afghanistan. we ran a piece in the last two issues ago on that. so it's really important. the question for us from just a business standpoint is, um, the economics of it. more often than not it works for us, it works best for us to work with freelance reporters or who are contributing for us and luke, who i just mentioned contributes for "the new york times" as well, and so we can get the content, we can get the ideas in the magazine we don't have, you know, a bureau in paris or kabul or something, something like that. so, but the international stuff, i think, is key
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